Phase Out Poverty

Community Farming

The Basics

Defining community farming


Community farming is when people who care about protecting and nurturing a healthy and local food source come together to build and support urban farms in their neighbourhoods. Some want to help community groups in managing executive functions of a farm, some want to get involved in the farming and value the community approach, and others simply enjoy the fresh and healthy source of locally-produced food, or want to visit and learn about urban farming. Community farming brings farmers and consumers together, creates sustainable agriculture, and establishes a local appreciation of fresh, healthy, locally-produced food. By supporting community farms, local communities become directly invested in their food system and enjoy social, economic, environmental, and agricultural benefits.




What is urban farming?


Urban farming is growing or producing food in a city or heavily populated area and assumes a level of commerce, the growing of product to be sold as opposed to being grown only for personal consumption or sharing. People have been growing crops and raising animals in and around cities for thousands of years, but a division between urban and rural has been sharply defined over time out of cultural bias viewing cities as “progressive” and farms as “backward”, and the misguided notion of risk to public health. You don’t have to be a corporation or own a lot of land to be an urban farmer. An person, a few friends, a nonprofit, or a group in the neighborhood can start and run an urban farm. Food can be the sold to restaurants or at a farmers market, given to a local soup kitchen or church, but primarily, the food is grown as a form of commerce between the grower and the customer. As more of people begin to understand our food system, more of us want to know and have input into how food is grown, how it's handled after being harvested and how it moves from one place to another along the food route. People have begun to understand we have no say in what's grown or how it's grown, and urban agriculture can change this. Urban farms can can grow to be the front line of the food system, increasing access to locally grown food and reintroducing the public to the many facets of food that have been lost as a culture. The way food grows and gains its nutrition are valuable lessons and make for a better informed urban consumer.




Phase Out Poverty


The vision of Phase Out Poverty (POP) is to build a system of support to help strengthen the vulnerable among us (individuals and families in need), and in doing so, reinforce the pride, respect, and wisdom that defines us a people and community. POP Support systems will be an integration of self-sufficient technology and practices distributed at the community level where everyday people need them the most. Project stages...

  1. Hydroponics / Aquaponics / Aeroponics (reduce grocery bills; fundraising)
  2. Anaerobic Digester (Reduce gas and municipal waste bills)
  3. Water Collection (Reduce municipal water bills)
  4. Rocket Mass Heater (Reduce heating, hot water, and electricity bills)
  5. Energy Roof (Reduce electrical, heating and hot water bills)
  6. Rammed Earth Building/Blocks (Fireproof home, improve air quality, and more)




Who will we support?


The measure of a person is the willingness to extend a helping hand despite social and economic prejudice that commonly divides us. We seek to bring together a community of people with the capacity to see beyond the surface in support of...

  • homeless and low-income youth, families, and seniors
  • critical support services (shelters, food banks, and social non-profits)
  • hidden poverty - a subset of people that live beyond the scope of designed support services, often due to stringent eligibility, prejudice, or individual challenges

Homeless youth, adults and seniors alike are an untapped resource of community strength and support, but too few take the time to see their potential. Despite the rise in poverty, the cost of living continues to grow - food, housing, goods and services, including taxes, utilities, and gas. We need to rally, empower, and raise up this valuable resource to build stronger and healthier communities - emphasizing a fair, equal, and equitable standard of living and a higher quality of life for all people and not just the few who can afford it.





Membership

Defining community farming


Community farming is when people who care about protecting and nurturing a healthy and local food source come together to build and support urban farms in their neighbourhoods. Some want to help community groups in managing executive functions of a farm, some want to get involved in the farming and value the community approach, and others simply enjoy the fresh and healthy source of locally-produced food, or want to visit and learn about urban farming. Community farming brings farmers and consumers together, creates sustainable agriculture, and establishes a local appreciation of fresh, healthy, locally-produced food. By supporting community farms, local communities become directly invested in their food system and enjoy social, economic, environmental, and agricultural benefits.




What is urban farming?


Urban farming is growing or producing food in a city or heavily populated area and assumes a level of commerce, the growing of product to be sold as opposed to being grown only for personal consumption or sharing. People have been growing crops and raising animals in and around cities for thousands of years, but a division between urban and rural has been sharply defined over time out of cultural bias viewing cities as “progressive” and farms as “backward”, and the misguided notion of risk to public health. You don’t have to be a corporation or own a lot of land to be an urban farmer. An person, a few friends, a nonprofit, or a group in the neighborhood can start and run an urban farm. Food can be the sold to restaurants or at a farmers market, given to a local soup kitchen or church, but primarily, the food is grown as a form of commerce between the grower and the customer. As more of people begin to understand our food system, more of us want to know and have input into how food is grown, how it's handled after being harvested and how it moves from one place to another along the food route. People have begun to understand we have no say in what's grown or how it's grown, and urban agriculture can change this. Urban farms can can grow to be the front line of the food system, increasing access to locally grown food and reintroducing the public to the many facets of food that have been lost as a culture. The way food grows and gains its nutrition are valuable lessons and make for a better informed urban consumer.




Phase Out Poverty


The vision of Phase Out Poverty (POP) is to build a system of support to help strengthen the vulnerable among us (individuals and families in need), and in doing so, reinforce the pride, respect, and wisdom that defines us a people and community. POP Support systems will be an integration of self-sufficient technology and practices distributed at the community level where everyday people need them the most. Project stages...

  1. Hydroponics / Aquaponics / Aeroponics (reduce grocery bills; fundraising)
  2. Anaerobic Digester (Reduce gas and municipal waste bills)
  3. Water Collection (Reduce municipal water bills)
  4. Rocket Mass Heater (Reduce heating, hot water, and electricity bills)
  5. Energy Roof (Reduce electrical, heating and hot water bills)
  6. Rammed Earth Building/Blocks (Fireproof home, improve air quality, and more)




Who will we support?


The measure of a person is the willingness to extend a helping hand despite social and economic prejudice that commonly divides us. We seek to bring together a community of people with the capacity to see beyond the surface in support of...

  • homeless and low-income youth, families, and seniors
  • critical support services (shelters, food banks, and social non-profits)
  • hidden poverty - a subset of people that live beyond the scope of designed support services, often due to stringent eligibility, prejudice, or individual challenges

Homeless youth, adults and seniors alike are an untapped resource of community strength and support, but too few take the time to see their potential. Despite the rise in poverty, the cost of living continues to grow - food, housing, goods and services, including taxes, utilities, and gas. We need to rally, empower, and raise up this valuable resource to build stronger and healthier communities - emphasizing a fair, equal, and equitable standard of living and a higher quality of life for all people and not just the few who can afford it.